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Pterygium Treatment
in Newport Beach

Learn about pterygium and its treatment options.

Watch for signs of pterygium
and prioritize eye health.

Have you noticed a fleshy bump growing on the white of your eye, creeping towards your pupil? You might be encountering pterygium, a common eye condition affecting many individuals. While often harmless, it can impact your vision and become a cosmetic concern.

At California Eye Associates, we offer comprehensive eye care, including diagnosis and treatment for pterygia. Our experienced team can assess your situation, discuss options, and guide you toward the best course of action. Schedule your appointment today and see clearly, comfortably, and worry-free!

Pterygium image 1

What is pterygium?

Pterygium, sometimes called “surfer’s eye,” is a fleshy, triangular-shaped growth that develops on the white part of the eye (conjunctiva), typically near the corner closest to the nose. It can also occur on the other side or affect both eyes simultaneously. There are three different types of pterygium: primary pterygium, recurrent pterygium, and progressive pterygium.

While not cancerous, pterygium can affect your vision if it grows and encroaches on the cornea, the clear dome covering the front of your eye. The exact cause of pterygium is unknown, but several factors are thought to contribute, including ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure, chronic eye irritation, and genetics.

What are the symptoms of pterygium?

Pterygium may not cause any symptoms at first. However, as it grows, you might experience redness and irritation, blurred vision, dryness, and cosmetic concerns.

The affected area may become red, itchy, or uncomfortable as the pterygium grows. If the pterygium grows large enough, it can cover part of your cornea, the clear dome at the front of your eye, causing blurred vision. The pterygium can interfere with tear production, leading to dry eye symptoms.

How does pterygium treatment work?

In most cases, pterygium doesn’t require treatment unless it causes symptoms or affects your vision. However, if it does cause problems, several treatment options are available. Eye drops or lubricants can help manage dryness and irritation.

Steroid eye drops can be used to reduce inflammation. If the pterygium is large and affects your vision, surgery may be necessary to remove it.

While there’s no guaranteed way to prevent pterygium, you can reduce your risk. Wear sunglasses that block UVA and UVB rays. Wear protective eyewear when outdoors in dusty or windy conditions. Schedule regular eye exams to monitor your eye health and detect any potential problems early.

Pterygium

Frequently Asked Questions

The exact cause of pterygium is unknown, but several factors are thought to contribute, including ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure, chronic eye irritation, and genetics.

Pterygium may not cause any symptoms at first. However, as it grows, you might experience redness and irritation, blurred vision, dryness, and cosmetic
concerns.

If it doesn’t cause symptoms or affect vision, treatment may not be necessary. However, if it interferes with your daily life or vision, options include eye drops, steroid eye drops, and, in some cases, surgery.

Left untreated, a large pterygium can significantly affect vision and require surgery. It can also increase your risk of chronic conditions from conjunctivitis to episcleritis.

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